The ‘Tech Support’ Phone Scam that could clear out your Bank Account

Facebooktwitterredditpinteresttumblrmail

Hello tellows friends,

Today we ask you to consider: Is your computer really on the blink, or are you falling victim to a scammer?

It’s the oldest trick in the book. A stranger calls you from a number that you don’t recognise, claiming to be from a company that they actually have nothing to do with. A short while later you discover that money has been stolen from your bank account. But how do the scammers do it?


We first explored this type of scam last year and it is currently on the rise once again.

What our users say:

Nic commented on the number 02476684093:

Answered my work phone as normal with a greeting. There was dead air for about 10-15 secs then a guy calling himself Josh said that he was from Tech Help Line. He hadn’t heard my greeting so did not know that it was a business. After saying that my Head Office would tell me if there was a problem with my computer he then said that he was talking about my home computer. That the was a spike in downloaded viruses in our area. I asked him how he got our number and he said that we were registered and asked if my name was Wolfgang. As I took him off script he seemed to get confused. I ended the call saying that it was a scam.

David J. commented on the number 02034091784:

A man asked me if I have windows on my computer, when I said yes, he tried to explain me that there is a virus that he could remove. Scam Scam Scam!       

Mister X commented on the number 02034091756:

Windows scam. A man called me this morning and he said that he was calling about a virus that I have in my windows pc. It isn’t true, I use a Mac!

How they do it:

In the case of this particular scam, the caller usually claims to be from one of the big technology firms, alleging that they have found a fault or virus on your computer. They then give you a series of instructions to follow in order for them to be able to ‘cure’ your device.

Firstly, the scammer reportedly asks you to log into your computer, before asking you to download software which will allow them to take a closer look at your device. This, of course, is the last thing you need. Through this, they can hack into your computer and gain access and control. This presents a risk to the safety of all data held on your device, including your personal information. Once they are in control of your device, the scammers are also at liberty to download viruses or keystroke technology onto your computer.

Of course, fraudsters don’t stop here. They want access to your finances and demand payment for their ‘services’. After you have handed over your card details for payment, the scammers are free to spend your money at will.

Given the speed of technological progress, it is little wonder that these scams are so successful. The average Brit is no tech expert and perhaps this is why we trust these strangers so easily. We at tellows offer you some tips on how to avoid falling victim to these fraudsters.

What to do in this situation:

  1. Perhaps the most obvious solution: hang up the phone whenever you doubt the legitimacy of the caller. On a phone call it is often all too easy to forget that the power is in your hands! Do not follow the instructions of the caller.
  2. If, after hanging up, you wonder whether the call was in fact trustworthy, ring the company in question using the official number from their website. This way you can safely find out the truth without risking your money and details.
  3. Check out the phone number on the tellows website to view comments and ratings left by other users and maybe even leave your own comment. Sharing is caring, and sharing valuable information with other members of our community could save someone else from being scammed.

If you are a victim of such a scam or have any information about fraudsters, it is also recommended that you report this on the Action Fraud Website.

tellows hopes that you enjoyed this article! Visit the App Store or Google Play to download the tellows app and avoid the scammers. And if you’re interested in hearing more from us, don’t hesitate to like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter!

Your tellows team

Facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagram

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *